plant image thumbnail
plant image thumbnail
plant image thumbnail
plant image thumbnail
Flamingo Flower

English Name

Anthurium Andreanum

Scientific Name

Description

Anthurium Andreanum has heart-shaped rosy red spathe of a polished waxen texture. The spadix is yellow. The blooms appear between Spring and Autumn and are very long lasting. Other species are available in pink or white spathes.

Colombia

Origin

Araceae

Family

64°F - 75°F

Temperature (°F)

Maximum: 2'

Height (feet/inches)

Perennial

Life Cycle

Flower

Type

Spring, Summer & Autumn

Seasons

None

Fragrance

Colors

Environments

Indoor, Shade & Conservatory

Watering

Water with soft water at least twice weekly in Spring and Summer to keep compost always moist. In Winter water once a week, keep roots just moist at all times.

Feeding

Feed every 14 days in Summer with liquid house-plant food.

Repotting

Re-pot in Winter every other year using peat-based compost and plenty of crocks in bottom of pot. Make sure that the crown of the plant sits on surface of the compost. If planted below, the stems will rot.

Propagation

Divide mature clumps at re-potting time or sow seeds in Spring.

Cultivation

Anthurium likes warm and humid atmosphere. Place it in light shade or indirect light. If stand in full sun it quickly dries out.

Tips

Wipe leaves with damp cloth. Use leafshine every 8 weeks.

Care

As it grows and start produce aerial roots, wrap the stem in damp sphagnum moss, or moss covered stick to which the roots can attach themselves.

Decorate

It is an attractive plant for table center decoration in dining room, lounge or in conservatory.

Humidity

Spray daily in Spring and Summer, once or twice a week in Winter. In hot weather stand pot on saucer of pebbles almost covered with water.

Soil

Good drainage peat-based compost.



Did you know?

The world's tallest-growing tree is the coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), which grows along the Pacific Coast of the United States, mainly in California. Interestingly enough, it's not the world's oldest-growing tree; that award goes to a bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata).