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plant image thumbnail
plant image thumbnail
plant image thumbnail
Chrysanthemum

English Name

Chrysanthemum

Scientific Name

Description

Chrysanthemum is the national flower of Japan. These plants are sold as pot plants and treated with growth retardant to keep a compact shape. There are many varieties that contain an attractive blend of single, double and semi-double flowers.

Japan

Origin

Asteraceae

Family

61°F - 70°F

Temperature (°F)

59°F - 70°F

Germination Temperature (°F)

10 days - 18 days

Germination Period

6" - 1'6"

Height (feet/inches)

Hardy Annual

Life Cycle

Flower

Type

Yes

Fragrance

Colors

Watering

Water when surface begins to dry, twice a week all year round. Do not stand pot in water.

Feeding

Feed every 2 weeks when they are in bud or in flower.

Repotting

Not necessary, once the plants have finished flowering, they are best discarded or planted in the garden. They will loose their compactness when they are planted in the garden.

Propagation

They can be raised from seeds sown in Spring, from root division or from cuttings taken from new shoots at the base of the stems 2-3 inch long from early to mid Spring.

Cultivation

Chrysanthemums should be kept in a cool place and when their flowers die or are damaged, cut them off where flower stalk joins main stem.

Pruning

Late Autumn cut back the stems to about 6 inches. Lift the roots carefully and shake off the soil. Remove the leaves and tie a label to each stem. Pack them in boxes surrounded by compost and store in a cold frame. Start watering when new growth appears.

Tips

If buying a Chrysanthemum, check that the buds show colour, as tight green buds often fail to open.

Care

Keep Chrysanthemum in bright light avoid sunshine at midday.

Decorate

They look best in window boxes, small and large tubs and some varieties in hanging baskets.

Humidity

Using soft water, spray lightly once a week avoiding flowers. In very humid situations the leaves will turn yellow.



Did you know?

Scientists were able to revive a flowering plant from the fossilized fruit found in the stomach of an Arctic ground squirrel who was trapped in ice around 32,000 years ago.