plant image thumbnail
plant image thumbnail
plant image thumbnail
plant image thumbnail
Dwarf Pomegranate

English Name

Punica granatum Nana

Scientific Name

Description

There are two species of Punica, one of which Punica granatum Nana can be grown indoors in a miniature form. The other Punica granatum is the normal pomegranate which eventually reaches 8-10 feet high.

Iran

Origin

Punicaceae

Family

45°F - 68°F

Temperature (°F)

3' - 4'1"

Height (feet/inches)

Shrub & Tree

Types

Summer & Autumn

Seasons

None

Fragrance

Color

Watering

In Summer water plentifully whenever the compost shows signs of dry out.

Feeding

Feed every 2 weeks with standard liquid fertilizer from Spring to Autumn.

Repotting

In Spring move plants into pots one size larger only once in 2 years, since the plant flowers best when its roots are slightly pot bound. After maximum convenient pot size 6-8 inches has been reached, top dress with fresh compost.

Propagation

In mid Summer take cuttings 2-3 inches long with a heel attached. Dip the heel end in rooting powder and plant in 3 inch pot of moistened peat moss and coarse sand. Enclose the pot in a plastic bag or propagator and stand in bright filtered light. Do not disturb the cuttings during the next 6-8 weeks. After uncover the rooted cuttings and start watering moderately.

Cultivation

Punica granatum Nana grows slowly to a height of 3-4 feet. The flowering period extend from late Spring through Summer and is followed by fruiting. The fruit although edible when fully ripe, are not very palatable. Punica granatum Nana loses most of its leaves after the fruiting period, but appear again the following Spring.

Pruning

In early Winter, lightly pinch back any spindly shoots to encourage bushiness.

Care

Give Punica Nana bright light with 3-4 hours a day of direct sunlight. During the rest period medium light is adequate. During the active growth period, normal room temperatures are suitable.

Humidity

Moderate, stand pot on layer of stones.

Soil

Soil based mixture.



Did you know?

The first potatoes were cultivated in Peru about 7,000 years ago.